Exercise Weekend

UI, C#, and Ruby Students: We'll spend time working on our LinkedIn profiles in class tomorrow. Please read this lesson to get a sense of what to expect, and what information you'll need handy. But hold off on constructing your profiles until tomorrow's class.

Have you heard of LinkedIn? Launched in 2003, LinkedIn is a social network service specifically oriented toward employment and professional networking. It's similar to sites like Facebook, but user profiles feature professional accolades, work histories, resumes, and more employment-related content.

Introduction to LinkedIn

It's not just a platform to chat with about careers. It's how many people actually find jobs! Most technical job applications request your LinkedIn URL right alongside the standard cover letter, resume, and contact information. One of LinkedIn's recent Workforce Report, and their ongoing Statistics Page even detail that:

  • Over 190 million American workers have LinkedIn profiles.
  • More than 30,000 U.S. companies specifically use it to recruit new hires.
  • 30 million total companies are represented on the platform.
  • An estimated 3,000,000 jobs are posted there every month.

Epicodus' own career services team report many graduates finding work on the platform. We've even seen a student's regular LinkedIn posts get noticed by a friend's manager, resulting in the manager reaching out, interviewing, and hiring that student!

Our internship companies also request to preview student LinkedIn profiles during the matchmaking process. Because this tool is so widely used, we consider it necessary for your upcoming job search. So, even though graduation and job searches are months in the future, we'll create our LinkedIn profiles now and begin regularly using them throughout the course. This will ensure we have active, well-rounded profiles by the time internship and employment companies see them.

Creating a LinkedIn Profile

If you don't already have one, create a free LinkedIn account here. Then use the instructions below to complete your profile:

  • Include a recent photo. It doesn't have to be a professional-quality headshot, but it should be easily recognizable (no sunglasses, make sure your face is clearly visible), professional, and friendly. If you don't have a photo handy, ask a classmate to take one.

  • Edit your tagline to "Junior Web Developer""Student at Epicodus", or something similar.

  • Create a custom easy-to-remember URL that includes your first and last name.

  • Write a short summary of what you're doing now (learning to code), what relevant skills you bring from previous work, hobbies, and/or volunteer experience, and what you're excited about working on in the future. Keep it under five sentences.

  • Add a link to your GitHub profile to your summary. The link will show up as a large box, which is absolutely okay. If you have a personal portfolio website or blog (whether now, or created later in the program) update this section to include links to those too.

  • Add 1-3 of your Epicodus projects to the Projects section. Include links to the GitHub repository or live site, if possible. Talk about what the projects do and what technologies and programming concepts were used. (Note: As you continue developing projects throughout the program, update this section regularly so it always displays the work you're most proud of!)

  • List your previous jobs under Experience, with a short description of what you did at each role.

    • Be specific and succinct - use concrete numbers and examples, like "Responsible for onboarding and training two dozen new employees in 3 months", rather than vague statements like "Fulfilled management duties beyond expectations."
    • If you have more than 3 or 4 previous jobs, just include the most recent (unless earlier roles are relevant to the types of jobs you'll be applying for after graduation). For non-technical roles, try to focus on the specific responsibilities that could translate into a technical career. (We'll also explore how to identify and discuss non-technical work experience that directly translates to technical jobs in upcoming journal prompts.)
    • Break down past experience descriptions into bullet points. You can easily do this by using the Alt-8 shortcut.
  • Add Epicodus to your Education section. Write a brief summary of what you're learning and doing at Epicodus. Don't write about what Epicodus is - write about your experience. For example, past students have written things like:

  • "I'm currently learning how to build web applications with JavaScript, Ruby/Rails, HTML, and CSS. More importantly, I'm learning how to think more like a programmer, write good code, and pick up new languages and technologies."

  • "At Epicodus I've learned how to learn programming languages more than learning any one language for the sake of itself. I've learned how to work towards a programming goal on my own and with others until success happens. I've also learned how quickly I can process a tremendous amount of information that is new and uncomfortable at first, and have it feel comfortable like a worn pair of jeans by the end of a week!"

But do not copy these examples - come up with your own that describes your unique experience.

  • In the Skills section, list skills and tools you've learned at Epicodus. Don't list only the names of the courses you've taken so far; but each major technology, skill, and concept you've practiced within them. For instance, at this point in the course, depending on your track, you've likely learned things like:

    • HTML
    • CSS
    • Sass
    • UI Design
    • JavaScript
    • jQuery
    • Object-Oriented Programming
    • C#
    • Ruby
    • Sinatra
    • .NET
    • SQL
    • Git
    • Test-Driven Development
    • Pair Programming
    • REST
    • Responsive Design
    • Mobile-First Design
    • And many more
  • Continue to update the Skills section as you learn more throughout the program. List non-Epicodus skills that may apply to your future work too.

  • Don't include months in any of the dates - just years.

  • After you finish updating your profile, check it out in an incognito window in Chrome to confirm your information is publicly visible and looks correct.

For examples, just search Epicodus on LinkedIn, and you'll find countless profiles of past graduates. Use their profiles, the way they described their Epicodus training, etc. as inspiration, but do not copy their content.

Connecting with Epicodus Career Services

After completing your profile, connect with career services staff from either Portland or Seattle, depending on your campus. This will allow staff access to your profile for more formal reviews and feedback closer to graduation.

Include a brief friendly note with your connection request, just like you will with future tech industry contacts (more information on this below).

Using LinkedIn Regularly

Creating your profile is a great first step. But it's important you also remain fairly active on the platform, especially before your eventual job search. Not sure where to start? Here are some ideas:

  • Connect with classmates. Not only will it be helpful to see what co-students are posting, you'll also have a guaranteed way to stay in touch after graduation.

  • Have a great experience working with another student? Consider writing them a recommendation highlighting the technical and interpersonal skills that made them so great to work with. Preview recommendations left for others (again, you can search Epicodus to see all kinds of past students) to get an idea of what these typically look like.

  • Have you thought about who you'll use as references if an employer requests them during your future job search? Do they include managers from past jobs, or anyone you're not already in touch with? Check if they're on LinkedIn and connect with them now, that way you don't have to scramble to find them later, and they can see what you're up to!

  • Chat with someone at a meetup or industry event? Follow up by connecting with them on LinkedIn! Make sure to include a brief note with your connection request, mentioning how you know each other. For instance "Hey Amanda, it's Jimena, we chatted at the Donut.js meetup in Portland after your talk about asynchronous JavaScript..."

  • Regularly document your work. Next time you make a site you're proud of, or tackle an interesting challenge, write a LinkedIn post about it! And update that Projects section to include your latest and greatest work examples.

  • Consider blogging. Longer-form blog posts documenting your experience can communicate your enthusiasm, skills, interest, and personality to future employers. Don't have a fully-built blogging site yet? No worries, sites like Medium are great spots to publish longer pieces. Make sure to share them to your LinkedIn feed!

  • Find a helpful resource? Others will probably find it helpful too. So why not share it on your LinkedIn feed? Make sure to accredit the original author to the best of your ability, too.

  • Regardless of how you use LinkedIn, make sure to keep your posts, comments, and interactions positive and professional. Again, your LinkedIn profile acts as a resume and representation of yourself to future employers and coworkers. Put your best foot forward, while simultaneously showing off your investment in the industry, eagerness to learn, and interest in technical work.